The Gayest Anime of 2016

In the mood for another sports anime after watching Haikyuu, I considered checking out Yuri on Ice. There was just one problem: it seemed a little too gay, even for a sports anime in the year 2016. So I checked out the rugby anime All Out instead.

I haven’t seen Yuri on Ice, and I’ve still only seen three episodes of Showa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu. Even giving them the benefit of the doubt, there’s no way either could be as gay as All Out. My knowledge of rugby is fairly limited, but after watching All Out, I’ve learned that it’s about 15 men who’re always blushing, clutching their bosoms, eating sweets, and otherwise carrying themselves the way Japanese schoolgirls wish they could.

The one thing that makes this anime unique is the coach. In most sports anime, the coach is off at the bar while the players come up with their own techniques and training methods inspired by the animals they saw on the way home. The coach in All Out is the star of the show. He single-handedly turns this team around.

As with most sports anime, the first season is largely dedicated to team-building and character backgrounds. This was average at best. All Out’s preferred method of developing conflicts is to gratuitously demonize the antagonists as sleazy pieces of shit, only to completely walk it back when the conflict is over. It’s lazy writing that desensitizes the viewer to later conflicts.

Final Grade: +

Updates:

  • Too much shit was broken with the site, so I’ve given it an overhaul. It’s still under construction, but if everything works even half as well as I think it does, it’s now the least broken/hacked it’s been since about 2009.
  • I’ll respond to comments sparingly from now on. It doesn’t mean I hate you (nor does it mean I don’t). I’m just lazy.

8 sports anime had non-existent coaches

  1. Do you even blog, boy?

    I’ve just finished a sports anime that doesn’t have a hint of gaiety. You probably wouldn’t like it.
    It’s called Scoobie-doo Mystery Incorporated. It combines coordenated trap building with Olympic level team mystery solving.
    Unlike its predecessors it does much to explore its cast, has good animation, the CG cars aren’t even bad, and it tells a compelling evolving narrative.

  2. I dropped the series after the first episode. Even though my experience is pretty limited, it felt way to generic. After things like Hajime no Ippo, Dia no Ace, Yowaimushi Petal, and Yuri on Ice, I feel like I needed a bit more and the first episode didn’t seem promising. These days I’m so busy with work, wife and child, and baking, that I can’t just watch everything the same way I used to. Gotta watch anime smarter, not harder. Besides, I’m a closeted/tsundere sports anime fan. It’s not like I wanna watch these things anyway, b-b-baka! HMPH!

  3. I don’t like sports anime, because I absolutely HATE sports in real life. However I watched Yuri On Ice and it’s the only sports anime that I have ever finished.

    I never thought that I would watch something so gay as Yuri On Ice and absolutely love it, but back in 2013 I saw Genshiken Nidaime and Hato (who is gay for Madarame) became my favorite anime character of all time (that spot was previously held by Kyon for 7 years). I actually enjoyed Nidaime so much that it became my favorite anime (before Nidaime it was Death Note).

    Then in 2014 I saw Love Stage!! which is romcom yaoi anime. It is the first true yaoi anime that I watched. I was actually rooting for gay relationship in anime which felt really weird at first. I really liked the main couple in Love Stage!!. I thought they were perfect for each other. It was really heartwarming, cute and funny anime.

    Those two kinda opened all the doors for me when it comes to gayness so Yuri On Ice didn’t feel that gay at all anymore. Hell, if I could find a guy like Hato I could date him. I still REALLY prefer girls (because of pussy and boobs, duh), but these anime managed to change me into a better person. So kudos for them.

  4. Haikyuu is hella fun but y’know
    Ping Pong the Animation is the only sports anime that is great. It doesn’t follow the traditional clichés of sports shounen and actually has interesting characters. It’ll resonate even more if you’re into competitive anything. No fantasy elements either
    Yuasa, baby

    • Ping Pong would’ve been great if it hadn’t beaten its themes to death. “Hero” this and “Shoe endorsements” that. Lots of otherwise good anime suffer from theme-ing too hard, but post probably not forthcoming.

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